IT Services's blog posts tagged with 'software'

Access Office anywhere and get 1TB free online storage

Jun

03

Office 365 Logo

The first draft of this blog post was written in the cloud, in a handy version of MS Word that goes by the name of Word Online and follows us around from computer to computer, hanging above us in the webosphere.  When you log in to Microsoft's (relatively) new Office 365, you have access to applications from the Office suite such as Word, Excel and PowerPoint.  The full range depends on from which platform you access Office 365, but whether it be Windows, Mac, iPhone or Android systems, you'll find the apps to be satisfyingly complete and without drastically reduced functionality. As well as accessing Office online, you can also download Office for Windows, Mac, iPhone and Android, giving you the option of using Office online or downloading it for use on your device or computer.

Download software or access Office online

Every student and member of staff at the University of Sussex can now download and use Office for free, and along with that comes the added benefit of being able to sign in to Office 365 from any web browser and create, edit and save documents.  (You'll also be pleased to know that I've just learned through experience and if you accidentally close your browser following a badly placed click of the mouse, the autosave is up to scratch and the document will be there waiting for you, even if you hadn't initially saved it.)

Screen shot of Office 365 home

Receive 1TB online storage for free

Our students and staff are allocated a massive 1 terabyte of cloud space through OneDrive, Office 365's integrated storage facility.  Documents can be uploaded from your computer or saved directly from Office apps such as Word Online; they can then be shared widely, including with contacts who do not have the same access to Office 365.  Incidentally, it's not just MS Office files that OneDrive supports - you can also store pictures, music and videos which you can also open and view/hear/watch from where it is without downloading it. You can also link Office 365 to your Dropbox account which, for example, makes it easy to open and edit Word documents that you already have stored online.

Visit the IT Services Office 365 page to find out how you can download the Office 2013 and access it online here: sussex.ac.uk/its/freeoffice

We'd love to hear about your experiences using Office 365 and how you are making it work for your personal and academic needs, so do leave comments below.

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Ten Top Apps for Students ... part 1

Oct

01

Adjusting to life at uni can be difficult, and even if you've been here for a while now you might find your organisational skills still need some tweaking. Thankfully, as with most other problems these days, there's an app to make it all seem much easier. Get some of these on your mobile device and you'll be well equipped for the rest of your academic journey.

    • Sussexmobile
       
      Screen Shot 2015-09-30 at 12.04.19
      The first app any Sussex student should be downloading is the Sussexmobile App. I wish it was pronounced mobeeel, like the BatMobile, but it's not - unless you lot decide it is, of course. This app is incredibly helpful for helping you navigate through university. It gives you access to a "lite" version of your inbox, so you can read and reply to messages, and compose new mail. The functionality is significantly reduced but it'll do until you can get back to your regular inbox. As well as the email, you can see your timetable, information about assessments, look at your library account and your printing account, find vacant study spaces and cluster computers as well as loads more.

Play Store     App Store




    • LinkedIn
       
      Screen Shot 2015-09-30 at 12.17.01


      It turns out I've become something of a LinkedIn advocate; if you feel like you don't know enough about what LinkedIn is or what LinkedIn does, have a read of my previous post on it. University days are a perfect time to carefully craft and maintain a top notch LinkedIn profile and it will get you more focused on your post-university career path early on. Work on that cv whilst ploughing through your studies to increase your employability at the end of it.

Play Store       App Store





    • Evernote
       
      Screen Shot 2015-09-30 at 12.17.25When it comes to organising your study notes, your thoughts, ideas, work plans, Evernote is pretty much the leader. It's available for nearly every device under the sun and utilised to the full on a laptop PC or MacBook, even the basic version can become every student's best friend. There are two levels of paid access that offer some really jazzy features such as turning your notes straight into a presentation for those most nervewracking seminars, or annotating PDFs. In the basic version, you can create a notebook for all your modules, you can make sub-notebooks as appropriate and then you can easily cross-reference by using what they call tags to tie together common themes. To use it is to love it (if you're a nerd for organisation).

Play Store      App Store




    • Sonocent
       
      Screen Shot 2015-09-30 at 12.18.32
      Now Sonocent is an Android-only app, but we'll get to an iOS equivalent in a moment. Sonocent is a completely excellent voice recorder, absolutely ideal for recording lectures and seminars. It's a bit less passive than others, however. As the lecture progresses, you can type notes directly into the app, you can take photos which attach to the file at the time point it's taken, and you can mark certain bits of the recording as important as it's happening. You can pause the recording and restart without it breaking the file up... it's an all-round good lecture-recording egg. It's also free which is rather brilliant, because its iOS equivalent isn't; SoundNote is excellent too, with similar features and it costs £3.99.

Play Store      App Store



    • RefMe
       
      Screen Shot 2015-09-30 at 12.18.05Back when I was an undergraduate, bibliographies took *forever* to compile, if you didn't do them as you went. It can really break your flow to keep going back to the referencing too, and we all know how evasive and fleeting flow can be. RefMe is a free app, available for both Androids and iPhones/iPads (coming soon for Windows phones, apparently). You can use your phone to zap a barcode or enter an ISBN number or a journal title and it will generate your bibliography (in your chosen style) and then export it for Word or Evernote documents. Literally a life saver, if you measure your life in terms of minutes that tick by doing tedious tasks. All right, it's a time saver, but it will save so much time you might get a bit more life away from the desk.

                                          Play Store       App Store

 

 

Visit the IT Services blog for Part Two of this article