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Heart Rate

May

17

Heart Rate

What is our heart rate? It is the number if times our heart beats per minute to pump blood around the body. Veins transport blood back to the heart whilst arteries transport blood pumped from the heart.

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An individual’s resting heart rate can be between 60-100 beat per minute. As we start to exercise and become fitter, our resting heart rate should decrease. This is because the heart becomes more efficient at pumping blood around the body, meaning at rest it takes less beats per minute to circulate blood around the body.

Heart rate below 60 beats is known as bradycardia and higher than 100 is trachycardia.

To work out your target heart rate use the following formulae.

20

-

Age

=

Target HR

   

220

-

25

=

195

   
             

Target HR

-

Resting HR

=

Heart Rate Reserve

   

195

-

65

=

130

   
             

60% intensity

x

Heart Rate Reserve

+

Resting Heart Rate

=

Target Heart Rate for 60%

0.6

x

130

+

65

=

143

             

70% intensity

x

Heart Rate Reserve

+

Resting Heart Rate

=

Target Heart Rate for 70%

0.7

x

130

+

65

=

156

             

80% intensity

x

Heart Rate Reserve

+

Resting Heart Rate

=

Target Heart Rate for 80%

0.8

x

130

+

65

=

169

             

90% intensity

x

Heart Rate Reserve

+

Resting Heart Rate

=

Target Heart Rate for 80%

0.9

x

130

+

65

=

182

A good recovery rate in a 60s period is 30-39 beats per minute. Your overall recovery rate is how long it takes your exercise heart rate to reach resting levels. The quicker we recover the fitter we are. Measure your fitness against the same session to get a more accurate account of your fitness. Look to take your heart rate every 60s post workout and compare the recovery rate each week.

When cooling down after exercise we should look for the heart rate to drop below 110 beats per minute before we go back to our desks.

Overtraining - monitoring your resting heart rate is a useful tool in measuring whether we have recovered from our previous session or whether we are overtraining. If our resting heart rate is 10 beats or more above its resting rate we should adjust the session that day to something lighter or even take the day off.